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College flewe 



Vol. 9. No. 17. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1910 



Price 5 Cents 



GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUBS' 
CONCERT. 



Enthusiastic audiences, nicely discrimi- 
nating in their applause, greeted this year's 
concert given Saturday and Monday even- 
ings, February 19 and 21. The first com- 
mendatory words of both the guest who is 
bound to appreciate, and the critic who is 
bound to criticize were concerning the ex- 
cellent selection of numbers. Glee Club 
concerts in general are prone to have a terrify- 
ing sameness whether they are productions of 
our brother or our sister colleges, reducing the 
interest to the merely local. This year's 
program presented a charming variety of 
songs unusual to the customary Glee Club au- 
dience, although the constant features were 
not eliminated, — the Mandolin Club Medley, 
the Topical Song, and "Coppah Moon" are 
not strangers. 

The Glee Club, on the whole, was most 
harmonious. Miss Binney never broke 
the singing into two parts so that one was 
conscious of a chorus and a leader; her lead- 
ing was almost perfectly followed and yet 
she suppressed it sufficiently so that at no 
point did she call attention away from the 
general effect to the mechanical detail of 
leading. The rendering of ' 'The Year's at the 
Spring," was an excellent initial impulse for 
the program as evidenced by its appreciative 
reception. There was a careful reservation 
of force for the climactic close which prevented 
the high notes trom the danger ot shrillness. 
The well deserved Brahms encore is worthy 
of mention on account of its excellent sub- 
ordination of parts in a selection where it is 
difficult to keep the first sopranos from 
becoming overwhelmingly predominant to the 
detriment of the altos. The Strauss waltz 
with its crisp staccato showed excellent 
attack; a spirited rendering prevented the 
monotony of the insistent rhythm. With the 
lisping encore, "The Friendly Cow," 
the Glee Club started on a series of charming- 
ly light and quaint songs which are attractive 
of themselves in their delicate music, and 
whose delicacy was well maintained by 
skilful rendering. "Snowflakes" was per- 
haps the most exquisite bit of work on the 
whole program, though it was closely rivalled 
by the following "Daffodils, " which presented 
a spirited contrast of measures. The encore, 
' ' Cobwebs, ' ' was of the same light and delicate 
quality and introduced the child-spirit, of 
which "Wynken, Blynken and Nod", was 
the embodiment. Tones were naturally and 
exquisitely sustained here, enunciation was 
excellent without being pronounced, and the 
solo parts by Miss Murray were charming. 
At times contrast of tone was a little too 
sharp. This was one of the best received 
numbers. "Coppah Moon," which is not 
especially well adapted to girls' voices, was 
in parts a little shrill. The quartet showed 
the individual voices of our best singers well 
and was deservingly applauded. 

No criticism of a Glee Club concert is 
complete without mention of the Topical 
Song. This year's witticism emanated from 
the pens of Miss Marjorie Snyder and Miss 
Ruth Crossman. Miss Binney 's dramatic 
treatment and the suggestive movements of 
the chorus added much to the clever verses. 
The Mandolin Club seemed more promi- 
nent this year than last, but was well deserving 
of the prominence. The leading was followed 



in absolute detail, attack was simultaneous 
and rendering expressive. Artistically con- 
sidered, in the point of view of the audience 
at least, the Sextet from "Lucia" was the 
best performance, with "Yellow Jonquils" 
as a close second. The Quintet was brilliant- 
ly executed with accuracy and a sparkling 
finish and merited its enthusiastic applause. 
The Mandolin Club's program was much more 
than a mere adornment to the Glee Club. 
The program was as follows: 

PART ONE 

I. a 'Neath the Oaks 

b The Year's at the Spring 

Mrs. H. H. A. Beach 
Glee Club 

II. The Meteor W. N. Rice 

Mandolin Club 

III. Waltz Song Richard Strauss 

Glee Club 

IV. Yankee Dandy A. J. Weidt 
Misses Blacker, Kinne, Longanecker, Morton, 

Peltz, Porter 

V. a Snowflakes Cowen-Gaul 
b Daffodils King Hall 

Glee Club 

VI. Medley Arranged by G. L. Lansing 

Mandolin Club 

PART TWO 

I. Sextet from "Lucia" Donizetti 

Mandolin Club 

II. Topical Song R. C. '10, M. S. '10 

Miss Binney 

III. Al Fresco Zevartel 

Mandolin Club 

IV. Wynken, Blynkeu and Nod Nevin 

Miss Murray and Glee Club 

V. a Yellow Jonquils P. F. Johanning 
b Memories of Strauss 

arr. Ripley-Lansing 
Mandolin Club 

VI. a Coppah Moon Harry Rowe Shelley 

Glee Club 
b All, 'Tis a Dream C. B. Hawley 

Quartet 

VII. a Barcarolle Offenbach 
b Alma Mater 

Glee and Mandolin Clubs 
The members and officers of the clubs this 
year are as follows: 

GLEE CLUB. 

Leaden Dorothy Binney, 19 10 
President: Marjorie Snyder, 1910 
Accompanist: Helen Bennet, 1910 

FIRST SOPRANOS 

Mary Colt, 1913 Ruth Hypes, 1913 

Harriet Cowan, 191 1 Belle Murray, 1912 
Helen Eaton, 191 2 Alice Leavitt, 19 10 

SECOND SOPRANOS 

Madeline Austin, 1912 Irma Bonning, 1910 

Grace Kilborne, 1910 Ruth Mulligan, 191 1 

Gertrude Rugg, 191 1 

FIRST ALTOS 

Dorothy Binney, 19 10 
Josephine Pitman, 191 2 
Lucy Roberts, 19 12 
Ruth Rodman, 19 12 
Madelene Tillson, 191 1 

SECOND ALTOS 

Carol Prentice, 1913 Ethel Rhoades, 1910 

Marjorie Snyder, 1910 
Berenice Van Slyke, 1913 

QUARTET 

Miss Binney Miss Leavitt 

Miss Kilborne Miss Snyder 

MANDOLIN CLUB. 

Leader, Ruth L. Blacker, 1910 
Assistant Leader, Marion Kinne, 191 1 
President, Alice R. Porter, 1910 



FIRST MANDOLIN 

Dorothy A. Baldwin, 191 1 
Esther H. Dow, 19 10 
Ruth A. Grinnell, 191 1 
Edith D. Haley, 191 1 
Alice F. Morton, 19 10 
Mildred M. Wilson, 191 1 
Gretchen B. Harper, 19 10 

SECOND MANDOLIN 

Ruth Blaisdell, 1913 
Catharine D. Brown, 1912 
Eleanor S. Hall, 1912 
Lili M. Zimmerman, 19 12 

THIRD MANDOLIN 

Artus James, 1913 Frances A. Fauncc, 1912 

VIOLIN 

Helen M. Adair, 1910 

BANJO 

Dorothy P. Clark, 1913 
Marian T. Shoemaker, 191 3 
M. Lillian Symonds, 1910 

TENOR MANDOLA 

Alberta Peltz, 191 1 Annie E. Williams, 1910 

GUITAR 

Ina Castle, 19 10 
Marian E. Johnson, 19 12 
Carrie M. Longanecker, 191 1 
Florence R. Mallory, 1910 
Alice R. Porter, 1910 
E. Maxcy Robeson, 191 1 
Gladys L. Thayer, 19 13 

BASS VIOL 

Edith Sweetser, 1910 

TYMPANIES 

Marion Kinne, 191 1 

DIRECTOR 

G. L. Lansing 



EXERCISES ON THE TWENTY= 
S ECOND . 

The annual exercises commemorating our 
first President were held as usual in College 
Hall Center. The exercises were led by Miss 
Douglas. Perhaps patriotism seems in- 
significant by the side of Glee Club, — per- 
haps, unfortunately but more truly we modern 
products do not cherish the charming senti- 
ment for the memory of the first Father of our 
country, — at all events, Wellesley College 
was represented by a feeble showing. The 
good national songs were sung, beginning with 
"America" and ending with "The Star 
Spangled Banner." The speakers for the 
occasion were Miss Case and Miss Coman. 
Miss Case, in speaking, contrasted the former 
times of war with all its attendant horrors 
with the present condition of peace, which has 
its evils as great and as terrible as those of 
war. This general awakening of the public 
conscience, said Miss Case, gives bright 
promise of amending the evils of peace, — a 
promise whose fulfilment rests upon the 
present generation. 

Miss Coman spoke on woman's service to 
the republic, showing how great a factor the 
woman is in formulating the ideals of honor 
in the coming Americans. She spoke es- 
pecially of the teacher in the slums who can 
give the immigrant boy and girl the first 
principles of civic conduct and social morality. 
Unfortunately the schoolroom and the out- 
side world are two different spheres and it is 
by bridging the gulf between ideals of right 
living and "business methods" that the 
college woman must count for something. 
Our ideals, said Miss Coman, must not be 
dropped when we leave college, — they must 
be carried with us and put into practice, 
else they have not been true ideal . 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Colleoe Hews. 

Press of N. A. Linosey & Co., Boston 



Published weekly. Subscription price, $1.00 a 
year to resident and non-resident. 

All business correspondence should be addressed 
to Elizabeth Nofsinger, Business Manager, College 
News. 

All subscriptions should be sent to Miss Alice 
R. Porter. 

All advertising correspondence should be addressed 
to Miss B. M. Beckford, Wellesley. 

Editor-in-Chief, Kate S. Parsons, 1911 

Associate Editor, Ruth Evans, 1911 

Literary Editors, 

Emily D. Miler, 1911 Dorothy Mills, 1911 

Muriel Bacheler, 1912 

Aicmn* Editor, Elizabeth W. Manwaring, 1902 

Business Manager, Elizabeth Nofsinger, 1910 

Subscription Editor, Alice R. Porter, 1910 

Assistants, 

Ridie Guion, 1911 Frances Gray. 1912 

"Entered as second class matter, November 12, 
1903, at the Post Office at Wellesley, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879." 



EDITORIAL. 

It would mean an efficient Wellesley 
if the individual girl could realize, and realize 
effectively, her share of the public conscience, 
whose awakening, as Miss Case said in speak- 
ing at the morning exercises on the twenty- 
second, depends largely on the present gener- 
ation. Miss Case pointed out to the meagre 
few who still have sentiment enough left to 
attend Washington's Birthday celebrations, 
that our social responsibility was not a thing 
of the outside world here, but of immediate 
necessity here at college. We wish that the 
meagre few who heard might realize the 
poignancy of the words, and with missionary 
zeal, leaven the great mass of the self-cen- 
tered and the indifferent. There w r ould then 
be an attendance at Student Government 
meetings which would be prompted, not by 
the thought that attendance was customary, 
nor by the persuasions of a virtuous room- 
mate, but by a realization which annihilates 
your argument that you do nothing at meet- 
ings except sit and vote. Perhaps you do 
not feel the necessity of Student Government 
or class meetings to yourself, but unless you 



We carry an immense line 
of 

NOVELTIES 

IN 

Jewelry and Silver 

at Very Low Prices. 

We especially call attention 

to goods suitable as gifts 

for all occasions. 



41 



Roman's flfteMcal College 

of Pennsylvania 

Sixtieth Annual Session. Thorough Course. 
Four years. Exceptional Facilities for Laboratory 
and Bedside Instruction. Post-Graduate Courses in 
Operative Gynaecology ; in Obstetrics, the Eye, Ear, 
Nose and Throat. A new hospital building in course 
of erection. Full particulars in catalogue. 
CLARA MARSHALL, M.D., Dean 

Box 900, 21st St. and North College Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 



DR. L. D. H. FULLER 
DENTIST 

Next to Wellesley Inn lei. 145-2 

Hours: 8.30 — 5.30 Daily, Tuesdays excepted 



can claim that these institutions bring 
Wellesley society no benefit, then as a mem- 
ber of that society you must accept your 
share of them. The world does not frown 
upon the college girl because of her ideals, 
but because these ideals are seldom social, 
almost inevitably selfishly personal. Isn't 
a brand new semester an excellent oppor- 
tunity for realizations and resolu lions? 



The discussions which take place in the 
Society Congress and the results of such dis- 
cussions will be published in the College 
News after each meeting of the Congress. 
Extra copies of the News may be obtained by 
sending five cents in stamps for each copy 
ordered, with name and address of sender, 
to Miss Elizabeth Nofsinger, Wellesley 
College. 



Now that our exchanges have been digni- 
fied by a table separate from that of the 
Social Study Circle, we take the opportunity of 
calling attention to them once more as 
worthy of your consideration. We get in the 
habit of thinking that Wellesley is the only 
college that — etc., — we get in the habit of 
fancying that all colleges are cut from pre- 
cisely the same pattern as Wellesley; as an 
antidote for this perverted channel of thought 
we offer you the publications of our brother 
and sister colleges. If you read the month- 
lies of Smith and Holyoke and Radcliffe, our 
own Wellesley Magazine will slip into a 
different relation. You will have a com- 
parative standard by which to judge our 
stories and our editorials, and unfortunate- 
ly you will be able to judge our out-put of 
verse, — or better, condemn our lack of it. 
See if the average story in the men's college 
monthly incurs the criticism made in the 
editorial of this month's magazine, — that 
college fiction has too much detail, too much 
local color. To the Freshman who sighs for 
new theme subjects, we offer this exchange 
table. Compare the fiction, or the essays, — 
the book reviews even of college publications; 
deduce conclusions as to college interests iri 
general from the items which serve as an 
index of college activities. We do not sug- 
gest by this, literary criticism of the college 
productions, — we anticipate your reproach- 
ful "Waste of time!" as you place them in 
the shadow of Browning and Meredith, — ■ 
but we do affirm that a comparative, though 
perhaps cursory study of what other college 
men and women write would make interesting 
generalizations. 



Announcement "^ 

A receiving office has been 
opened at 36 Central Street, 
Wellesley, to take care of 
goods to be cleaned, dyzd f 
or spots removed; also 
contract pressing. Best 
work done and quick serv- 
ice given. Dry cleansing a 
specialty. 

Your patronage is solicited. 



Perusal of these magazines, however 
slight and hasty, will also tend to correct 
the easy statements that we are prone to 
make about other colleges. We affirm that 
such a college has abolished societies, that 
such another has the most wonderful liter- 
ary work, that such a third is levelling frat. 
houses to the ground, — all this on the strength 
of a rumor. Knowledge of events, — even 
though they are but collegiate and not 
national, — is vastly more useful if accurate. 

We add a final injunction to our plea for 
readers of exchanges. Please observe the 
book of simple but imperative rules which is 
on the exchange table and in addition, — 
observe the rules. 



Lost notices may be inserted in the News 
for twenty-five cents if the notice does not 
exceed thirty words. 



IE ANY DEALER 

IT OFFERS YOU 
A SUBSTITUTE 
WHEN YOU 
ASK FOR 



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Silk 50c. 
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Geortiis Frost Co., makers, boston, mass., u.s.a. 



LOOK 




COLLEGE NEWS 



MEXICAN INDIAN BLANKETS. 

THE NEWEST THING for jour College Room, Den, Library or 
Music Room; for Canoes, Rugs, Couch Covers, Portieres and 
Wall Decorations. GORGEOUS COLOR EFFECTS. BEAUTI- 
FUL DESIGNS. Select your Favorite background Color: Crim- 
son, Blue, Red, Green, White, Black. 

7ft. 8in. x 3ft. lOin. $5.00. 6ft. 8in. x 3ft. 4in. $3.50. 5ft. 4in. 
x 2ft. 8in. $2.50. The set of three (one of each size) $10.00 

SILK SCARFS. 

The Most Beautiful Mexican Hand-drawn Head Scarf. Made 
of finest pure silks. Colors: White, Blue, Cream, Red, Black or 
any special color desired. The Only Proper Thing for Theater, 
Opera, Dance or any Evening Wear. Price $10.00. 

SENT ANYWHERE, CARRIAGE PREPAID, ON RECEIPT OF PRICE. 
ORDER TO-DAY. MONEY BACK IF YOU WANT IT. 

MEXICAN BLANKET CO., Aguascalientes, Mexico. 




COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



February 24. 4.20, P.M. Organ Recital in Houghton Memorial 

Chapel by Professor MacDougall. 

8.00, P.M. In College Hall Chapel. Lecture by Professor 

Lewis B. Paton on "The Social Problem in Israel in the Time 

of the Prophets." 
February 25. 7.30, P.M. In College Hall Chapel. Lecture by 

Professor Lewis B. Paton on "The Solution of That Problem in 

the Law, Wisdom, Literature and the Prophets." 
February 27. Sunday morning, at 1 1.00, A.M. Service in Houghton 

Memorial Chapel. Sermon by Rev. Oscar E. Maurer of New 

Haven. 

7.00, P.M. Vespers. 
February 28. At 7.30, P.M. In College Hall Chapel. Lecture by 

Dr. Richard C. Cabot on "Tuberculosis." 



REVISED ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE DRAMA 

COMMITTEE. 



THE TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB. 
Lectures at the Club House, 3 Joy Street, at 8, p.m. 
February 23. Frank Chouteau Brown, on "Modern Stage Settings," 
with colored stereopticon illustrations, including views of the 
productions at the New Theater in New York. Single ad- 
mission, 50 cents. 
March 23. Professor George P. Baker, on "Our Critical Attitude 
toward Plays." Single admission, 50 cents. 

Plays in Union Hall, at 8, p.m. 

March 31 (changed from April 27). "Jeanne d'Arc at Vaucouleurs," 
a play in three acts by Will Hutchins, of Deerfield, to be per- 
formed by the Deerfield Players with the original cast and cos- 
tumes. Also, "The Horse Thieves," a play in one act by Her- 
man Hagedorn, to be performed by the Neighborhood Club of 
Medford. 

Course tickets for the two lectures and the plays, $1.50; re- 
served seats for the plays alone, $1, 75 cents, 50 cents. Order as early 
as possible of Edward H. Chandler, 3 Joy street, Boston. 

If there is sufficient demand the plays will be repeated on 
Friday evening, April 1. 



READINGS 



OFFERED BY THE 
OF ELOCUTION. 



DEPARTMENT 



The Department of Elocution announces a course of readings 
to be given in College Hall Chapel as follows: 
March 14. Original Monologues, Beatrice Herford. 
March 21. Readings from his own writings, F. Hopkinson Smith. 
April 4. "An Encore," — from "Old Chester Tales," Margaret 

Deland. 

Tickets for the course, $1.00. Single tickets, 50 cents. To be 
had at the College Bookstore after March first. Single tickets also 
sold at the door. 



MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS. 



GALLERY CONFERENCES. 

The conferences named below will be given in the galleries of 
the museum during February and March. For tickets of admission, 
apply by letter to the Secretary of the Museum. Applicants 
requested to specify the conferences they wish to hear in the order 
of their preference. One ticket only, entitling to a single seat at 1 he 
conference, earliest in order of preference for which tickets remain, 
will be sent in immediate response. A ticket for each additional 
conference applied for will be sent on the day before the conference 
if places then remain. The conferences begin at 2.30, P.M., and it 
is especially requested that the audience should be in their seats by 
that hour. 

Thursday, February 10, in the Fifth Century Room, by the Di- 
rector of the Museum, on the New Three-sided Greek Relief. 
Wednesday, February 16, and succeeding Wednesdays, in the Print 
Study, by Mr. Emil H. Richter, A Study of Selected Prints. 
Thursday, February 17, in the Mastaba Gallery, by Mr. Louis Earle 

Rowe, on Early Egyptian Sculpture. 
Thursday, February 24, in the Japanese Library, by Mr. Akakura 

Yoshisaburo, on Chinese Script. 
Thursday, March 3, in the Buddhist Room, Mr. Chinosukc Niiro 
will speak in Japanese, interpreted by Mr. Kojiro Tomita, on 
Japanese Sculpture. 
Thursday, March 10, in the Archaic Room, by Mr. Lacey D. Caskey, 

on Archaic Greek Art. 
Thursday, March 17, in the Panel Room, by Mr. John Briggs Pot- 
ter, A Conversation on Italian Primitives. 
Thursday, March 24, in the Japanese Corridor, by Mr. Francis 

Stewart Kershaw, on Chinese Pottery. 
Thursday, March 31, in the Mastaba Gallery, by Mr. Joseph 
Lindon Smith, on A Mastaba Chamber. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



At the meeting of the Christian Association, February 17, Dr. 
Lockwood read several poems of Herbert, Vaughn, Tennyson, Mrs. 
Browning and Browning. 



MUSIC NOTES. 



Service List. 
Sunday Evening, February 20, 19 10. 
Service Prelude. 
Processional 863. 
Invocation. 
Hymn 871. 

Service Anthem: "Hark, hark, my Soul, angelic Songs are 
swelling." 

Psalm 33. (Gloria Patri) H. R. Shellev 

Scripture Lesson. 
Prayer. 

Organ: # Largo Handel 

Choir: "The Strain Upraise D. Buck 

Harp: Fantasie. 

Violin: Air Op. 28. 

Prayers (with choral responses). 

Recessional. 

The Wellesley College Choir. 

Professor MacDougall, Organist. 



PRIMER OF PSYCHOTHERAPY. 



Small, Maynard & Co. will issue shortly Self Help and 
Self Cure, a Primer of Psychotherapy, written in collaboration by 
Elizabeth Wilder and Edith Mendall Taylor. 

Wanted: The Scarsdale Union Free School (Scarsdale, N. 
Y.), a public school restricted to grammar and primary grades, 
wishes a principal for the year 1910-1911. Further information may 
be obtained by addressing Miss Mary Caswell, 130 College Hall. 

Lost: Somewhere between Beebe Hall and College Hall, or in 
one of these buildings on the morning of February 8, a new black 
A. A. Waterman automatic self-filling fountain pen. Finder will 
confer a great favor on the loser by bringing or sending pen to F. 
E. Hastings, 60 Beebe Hall. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



COOK'S RESTAURANT 

88 BOYLSTON STREET 

Next to Colonial Theater 

Matinee Lunches 



Wigs, Beards, Switches, Curls, Puffs, Etc., to Hire for Amateur Theatricals and 
all Stage Productions. Grease, Paints, Powders, Burnt Cork, Rouges, Etc. 

M. G. SLATTERY IRg A ffi{§& WIGS 

226 TREMONT STREET - - - BOSTON 

Between Eliot and LaGrange Sts., Opp. Majestic Theatre 

Competent Make-up Artists Special Attention Given 

Furnished to Order Work 

Tel. Oxford 657-1 



TOPICAL SONG. 



Tine: I wonder who's kissing her now? 

I. 
At Wellesley you may think we're quite satisfied 
With conditions existing here now, 

But, oh dear me, no! 

How could you think so? 
Why haven't you heard of the row? 
There are six little houses — now don't look so shocked! 

There's no need for that Freshman to blush, 
For the Good of the College we've banished from them 

Sisters, Cousins and Sophomore Crush. 

Chorus. 
1 wonder who'll live in them now, 
I wonder just who and just how, 
Will we draw lots and apply to see 

T. Z. E.'s balcony? 
I wonder if Freshmen will play 
Round the once sacred lamp of Z. A. 
Will Phi Sigma Owls be zoology fowls? 

what are we coming to now? 

II. 
Let me draw you a picture of this institution 
As 'twill be a year from to-day. 

But I very much fear 

When these things you hear, 
You'll want to be staying away. 
Poor 191 1, on your young horizon • 

The grim academic will loom. 
No childish diversions — no forensic fires — 

To lighten the terrible gloom. 

Chorus. 
Now doesn't it seem to you cruel 
To abolish the social schedule. 
See Wellesley girls with no florists' debts, 
Teachers' pets, Suffragettes! 
They'll call economic trips "bats," 
They'll go to their classes in hats! 

With a heart-rending sigh 

"Social Units" will die! _ 
And that's what we're coming to next. 

III. 
At Bryn Mawr and Vassar, at Smith and Mt. Holyoke, 
They don't do as we do at all. 

Dick, Harry and Tom 

Can come to the Prom 
Or dance at the grand Junior ball, 
But when Wellesley maidens have friends out from Cambridge 

Par be it from them to be gay! 
Much to his alarm, they take swain by the arm 

And to "Vespers" they lead him away. 

Chorus. 
I wonder what they talk of then, 
Those whispering girls and their men? 
The girl softly coaches him when to rise, 
Explains that "lights on would be hard on the eyes." 
He asks why the choir girls all sway. 
"Are those long, floppy gowns in their way?" 
See that tall stunning girl— " Is her hair in a swirl?" 

1 wonder if that's what you say? 

ROOMS AT PIGEON COVE. 

Mrs. Brower wishes to announce that her attractive home at 
Pigeon Cove, furnace heated, delightfully situated near the sea, and 
having a nice view of the water, will be open for spring guests. For 
rates and further particulars address 

MISS E. V. BROWER, Pigeon Cove, Mass. 



The Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume 

COTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Makers of the 

Caps, Gowns and Hoods 

to Wellesley, Radcliffe, IVIount Holyoke, 
Bryn Mawr, Barnard, Woman's College 
of Baltimore, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Cornell, Univ. 
of Pa., Dartmouth, Brown, Williams, Amherst, Colorado 
College. Standford and the others. 

CORRECT HOODS FOR ALL DEGREES 
Illustrated Bulletin and Samples on request 




IV. 

It is sad how the stories and newspaper 
Articles slander the poor College Girl — 

She gossips all day, 

She goes to the play, 
She is deep in the mad social whirl. 
But far worse than this is their insinuation — 

How true it is now you can judge — 
They cling to the myth that we spend all our time 

Making chafing-dish "rabbits" and fudge. 

Chorus. 

I wonder if that's what they'd say 

If they knew of conditions to-day? 

The good "stirring" times of the past are o'er, 

The pale yellow "rabbit" will dwell here no more. 

The Freshman vocabulary 

Doesn't even include "midnight spree," 

For the mighty A. C. 

Has just passed the decree 

That the "vill" chafing dishes must go! 



M. S. 
H. C. 



10 
'10 



THEATER NOTES. 



Hollis-street: Maude Adams in "What Every Woman Knows. 

Tremont: "Rebecca of Sunny brook Farm." 

Shubert: "The Midnight Sons." 

Colonial: J. E. Dodson in "The House Next Door." 

Majestic: Walker Whiteside in "The Melting Pot." 

Park: William Hodge in "The Man from Home." 



ART EXHIBITIONS. 



Museum of Fine Arts: Etchings by Whistler. 
Kimball's Gallery: Fantin-Latour and Monticelli. 
Doll and Richards': Engravings by Nantueil. 
Copley Gallery: Mr. Little's Paintings. 
Copley Gallery: Mr. Elliott's Pastel Drawings. 
Miss Thompson's Watercolors. 

Loan Exhibition of Pictures. 

Mr. Smith's Watercolors. 
Normal Art Gallery: Miss Richardson's Paintings. 
Vose's Gallery: Boughton and Church. 
Leonard's Gallery: Mr. Hardwick's Pictures. 
St. Botolph Club: Mr. Wendell's Paintings. 
Arts and Crafts: Exhibition of Metal-work. 



Copley Gallery: 
Franklin Union: 
Cobb's Gallery: 



3 out our Wltlh&hv $artj> 

THE COMING SUMMER 
in a comprehensive and enjoyable 

Curopean Cour 

Especially Arranged for College Girls. 
Under the escort and business management of a conductor 
experienced in European Travel. 

For particulars, address 

Bertha M. Beckford, Wellesley College, 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Every Requisite for a 



Dainty Ximcb 



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COBB, BATES & YERXA CO. 

55 to 61 Summer Street 

(Only One Block from Washington Street) 



THE COOPERATIVE SHIRT=WAIST FACTORY, 



Miss Mary E. Dreier, President of the "Women's Trade Union 
League" in New York, has answered some of the questions that have 
arisen in our minds since the shirt-waist strike has been discussed 
here at college. It has been generally understood that the estab- 
lishment of a model shirt-waist factory would solve some of the 
problems of the situation. Miss Dreier replies: "As a matter of 
fact, the co-operative factory is not at present to be considered, but 
we arc planning to propose to the manufacturers to put the union 
label on their shirt-waists and dresses, and if our young college 
women will support the girls to the extent of demanding the label on 
their waists they will render a real service. Perhaps they can be 
made to realize that the union label simply indicates to the pur- 
chasers that in the factory, where they are made, the right of col- 
lective bargaining is accepted, and that that means that the girls 
elect two or three representatives from their shop to discuss with 
their employer the wages which are to be paid for the making of the 
waists, and that they reach an agreement. Very often the term 
'collective bargaining' is misunderstood, and many people do not 
know exactly what the union label stands for. The importance of 
pushing the union label is this, — many of the girls in the trade are 
young, and the influx of young foreign girls must find work before 
they know the cost of living; this makes it all the more important for 
the public to stand with the union for decent conditions and reason- 
able hours and wages." 

This statement of Miss Dreier's may convince us of the essen- 
tial importance in having a label on the union-made shirt-waists, 
and it is also helpful to know that, at the convention of New York 
Federation of Women's Clubs, last week, a resolution was passed 
that that organization support the union label on shirt-waists and 
dresses. It is coming to be more generally recognized, all over the 
country, that now is the critical moment, now is our opportunity to 
further the cause of the shirt-waist strikers and to make the results 
permanent. 



ACCEPTED SPORT LISTS. 



Basket-ball. 



iqii 
Anderton, E. 
Clark, D. 
DuBois, F. 
Frazer, G. 



1912 
Allbright, E. 
Brewer, F. 
Brooks, A. 
Buckley, M. R. 



We are offering during our dull season an inducement for your trade. 
Among our foreign connections from whom we import linens we have been of- 
fered a choice of a quality of one of their best linens in a large variety of color- 
ings, of which samples will be sent on request. 

We will make a coat and skirt of this material in the very newest style, 
carefully put together, that would really cost $35.00, for $27. 50 during Feb- 
ruary. We are offering to make a thoroughly first-class white or colored serge 
coat and skirt, lined with the best silk or satin, that has never been offered be- 
fore less than $60.00 for the extremely low price of $40.00 We have a 
reputation for fine work and shall not fail to live up to it now. Will be pleased 
to show you styles and goods when you call. 

CHAS. H. HURWITCH, 31 West Street. 




Ladies' Matter 

, 160 Tremont Street 
BOSTON 

Over the English Tea Room 



Fuller, M. 
Jenney, E. 
Kinnie, .M. 
Koon, E. 
Rankin, M. 
Rice, M. 
Robeson, M. 
Sawyer, M. 
Smith, E. 
Stafford, R. 
Vliet, F. E. 



Hockey. 



191 1 
Bausman, L. 

Bleazby, A. L. 
Condit, L. 
Dalzell, L. K. 
flays, B. R. 
Lieberman, N. 
Longaker, E. P. 
Miller, E. 
Rugg, G. 
vSt earns, M. E. 
Stewart, E. 
Terry, K. 
Thomas, N. 
Williams, K. 
Wyckoff, J. 



Cross, Helen 
Dillingham, I. 
< iucrnsey, M. 
Hepburn. B. 
Kriebel, I. 
Lane, M. 
Price, K. 
Schmucker, D. 
Shcprn-d-Elmer, H. 
Stickley, M. 
Sumner, A. 
Williams, C. 



1912 

Andrews, A. 
Bangs, F. 
Bingham, K. 
Bullard, D. 
Clarkson, G. E. 
Deyo, B. V. 
Erskine, E. C. 
Elliott, E. 
Gorham, M. 
Gowing, K. 
Law, M. 
MacKillop, M. 
McCroddan, S. 
Newell, S. 
Noble, L. 
Ranney, B. 
Sherman, M. 
Slack, G. 
Weller, G. 
Widner, A. 
Yarnall, M. 
Yocum, M. 



There will be an Exhibition and Sale of 

Nelson's De Luxe Edition 

-of- 

STANDARD AUTHORS 

at Wellesley Inn, February 26 and 28 inclusive. 

You are cordially invited to call and inspect these 
dainty books. 



THE CONSIGNORS' UNION, Inc. 

FOOD SHOP 48 Winter Street, Boston LUNCH ROOM 

LUNCHEON U to 3 

AFTERNOON TEA 3 to 5 

Cake, Pastry, Bread, Etc. on Sale 



COLLEGE NEWS 



)f\\l/tJpV< CH0C0LATE 

PCjjfiUjO BONBONS 

DELICIOUS— DAINTY— PURE 

416 Washington St. (4 Doors North of Summer St.) 


Wellesley Spa rr,,r eTr 

Our Specialty FUDGE CAKE ?E£Hr8? ) 

PACKED UP TO SEND BY EXPRESS TO ANY PART OF U. S. 

583 Washington Street, Opposite The Wellesley Inn 


OLD NATICK INN 

South Natick, Mass. 
Open Summer and Winter 


PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS. 


The Walnut Hill School 

NATICK, MASS. 

A College Preparatory School for Girls 

Miss Conant and Miss Bigelow 
Principals 


Single rooms and suites 

Breakfasts before 9 
Dinner I to 2 
Tea Served 4 to 6 
Supper 6.30 to 7.30 
Tel. Natick 9212 A. BARRATT, Mgr. 


AFTER MR. TENNYSON AND GLEE CLUB. 

I come to haunts of Her that asked, 

I make a noble showing, 
And sparkle forth with all the rest, 

But don't know where I'm going. 

By thirty hills I hurry down, 

And scattered edifices: 
Well, Holy Smoke! is this a town? 

Now, who could tell what this is! 

* * * * 

She chatters on in endless streams 

To rouse my angry passions, — 
She burbles — ask not what she means — 

Of all the latest fashions. 

And some depart, would I could so! 

Is there escape? Oh, never! 
For men may come and men may go, 

But she goes on forever! 


JOHN A. MORGAN & CO. 

Pharmacists 

SHATTUCK BUILDING 
WELLESLEY 


HOLDEN'S STUDIO 

20 North Ave., Natick 

High Grade Portraits 

Telephone 109-5 






WELLESLEY FRUIT STORE 
Wellesley Square 

(where the cars stop). Carries a full 
line of Choice Fruit, Confectionery and 
other goods, and Vegetables of all 
kinds usually found in a first-class 
fruit store. Also Olive Oil. Free 
Delivery. 
Tel 1^8-2 OFOROE BARKAS 


Pianos for Rent 

DERBY'S 
Piano Rooms 

Clark's Block, - Natick 






WELLESLEY TAILORING CO. 

W. ROSEINTHAL 

Ladies' and Gents' Custom Tailoring 
Suits Made to Order 

FURRIER 

543 Washington Street, Wellesley, Mass. 
Tel. 349-2 


TAILBY 

THE WELLESLEY FLORIST 

Office, 555 Washington St. Tel. 44-a 

Conservatories, 103 Linden St 

Tel. 44-1 

Orders by Mail or Otherwise are 


ON SHIRT-WAIST STRIKES IN GENERAL. 

"I do approve," the Freshman said, 

"This strike, — this reformation, 
Because, the closed shop means, you see, 
Such awful ventilation." 


Given Prompt Attention. 
J. TAILBY & SON, Props. 

Wellesley, Mass. 


F. H. PORTER 

PLUMBER, Wellesley Square 


ge £$aban 3nn 

CHOPS, STEAKS, SALADS, 
COFFEE, CHOCOLATE, 


Japalac and Mission Stains 
New Patterns for BrassWork 


ON THE INNOVATION IN BLUE BOOKS. 

A bit of the sky fallen through me on high, 

A piercing cerulean hue, 
Indeed Mr. Parrish has tints that are garish 

Compared with this heavenly blue. 
If I flunk my exam after all that hard cram, 

As it seems I shall probably do, — 
'Twill be that my mind went hopelessly blind 

At the sight of that new-fangled blue. 


Always ready for 
Wellesley Students 


Dry and Fancy Goods 

Fine Underwear 
M A CI U I R E 

The Norman, Wellesley Sq. 


F. DIEHL, JR. 

Boarding and Livery 
STABLE 

Wellesley, - Mass. 


ALICE Q. COOMBS, Wellesley '93 
Announces the Opening of a 

Tea Room and Food Salesroom 

in TAYLOR BLOCK 

Orders for Table Parties and Spreads 

Solicited 
Decorated Birthday Cakes a Specialty 


THE KANRICH BAND 
AND ORCHESTRA 

The Best Musicians for nil 

occasions. 

Orchestrations and Vocal 

Arrangements. 

ALBERT M. KANRICH 

l<> la Tremont St., Boston 


EPITAPHIUM . 

Underneath those covers blue 
Lies the little bit I knew, 
Treat it gently, Teacher kind, 
It's an index of my mind: 
All I know I've offered you 
Underneath those covers blue. 






BARNEY & BERRY'S 


SMITH BROTHERS 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs 


SKATES 

May be purchased at a 


Miss I. L,. Blissard 

J^air Brewing anb ^ijampooing 

TREATMENT OF THE HAIR AND SCALP A SPECIALTY 

flDamcurtuQ, Gbtropofcp anfc facial /l&assaoe 

The most scientific and latest approved instrument for giving 
the celebrated Vibratory Facial and Scalp Treatments 

Tel. 122-1 THE NORMAN, Over t. B. Parker's Shoi Store. WfllfSUV, MASS. 


2 and 4 New Faneuil Hall Market 

BOSTON 


discount to College 
Students by applying to 

Elizabeth Nofsinger, 

Business Manager, 
College News. 


DR. M. O. NELSON 

©entist 

Room 4, Walcott Building 
Natick, Mass. 
Tel. Natick 101-12 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Jfflib=jpear <0toer. 
Wt'll fjelp pou celebrate. 



£tje Wtlkxky 3lnn. 




A great variety of sweets in 
packages to suit every taste ana 
purse — 

5 Dollars to 5 Cents 



Have you tasted 

"BREW" 

made with 

Whitman's Instantaneous 

'"'•ncolcte ? 



MALLO-CAROS, caramel wrapped 
around marshmallow, in 10-cent packages, 
are great. 

Sole Agent for Wellesley, 

N. CLARK CLEMENT. 



J 




vs?<*L 



xfee 



Ladies' Ready=to=Wear Department 
Gloves, Jabots, Collars, 

Riding-Stocks, Mufflers, 

Waists and Sweaters 

New and Exclusive Styles 



^r/^~ jo Washington and 

I^W//(7^ Summer Streets, 
-7 . " Boston, U.S.A. 



ACCEPTED SPORT LISTS, Continued. 



Rowing. 



1910 

Bacon, L. 
Dey, D. 
Elliott, R. 
Finlay, W. 
Jamieson, E. 
Johnson, E. 
Midwood, E. 
Owen, H. 
Proctor, E. W. 
Randall, E. 



1911 

Andrews, M. 
Baxter, S. 
Bennett, M. 
Coffin, H. 
Eustis, C. 
Fitzgerald, M. 
Hall, E. B. 
Hartley, G. 
Howard, E. 
Paul, H. 




FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND HOTHOUSE PRODUCTS 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO HOTEL, CLUB AND FAMILY ORDERS 

ISAAC LOCKE & CO. 

97, 99 and 101 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 



Burdett, M. 
Balderston, E. 
Beach, C. 
Bradley, M. 
Carr, Lina, 
Farrar, H. E. 
Frazer, M. 
Ferguson, M. 
Gamble, B. 
Greene, H. 
Herring, A. 
Homer, H. 
Howarth, G. 
Jeneson, F. 
Kahn, C. 

Wilson, E. 
Ridgeway, D. 



1911 
Coan, E. 
Davis, F. R. 
Earle, G. 
Foster, D. E. 
Kroger, L. 
Lincoln, M. 
Mackay, E. H. 
Mills, D. 
Pennell, E. L. 
Spaulding, F. 
White, G. A. 



1913 



Coxswains. 

Wilbur, E. 
Running. 



Knowlton, M. 
Lewis, B. P. 
Levy, P. 
McDermott, M. 
McDowell, D. 
McKee, E. 
Powell, C. 
Perry, G. 
Raymond, D. 
Rider, M. 
Selden, D. 
Swope, E. 
Welch, D. 
Wilson, M. E. 
Winslow, M. 

Stratton, E. 
Whitney, H. 



1912 
Bott, S. 
Bryant, E. 
DeHart, G. 
Hastings, C. 
Howe, R. 
Little, A. 
Meredith, H. 
Oldershaw, B. 
Oliver, M. B. 
Riley, C. 
Reynolds, H. 



Schoonmaker, E. 



LECTURE ON TUBERCULOSIS. 



On Monday evening, February 28, at 7.30 o'clock, Dr. Richard 
Cabot of Boston will lecture in College Hall Chapel on "Tuber- 
culosis, — Its Bearing upon Social Relations and the Duty of the 
General Public Toward It." It is seldom that we have an oppor- 
tunity of so important a lecture by such an excellent authority. 
It is a lecture which cannot fail to be of great interest to all collegt 
students and to those contemplating work in foreign fields it will be 
full of suggestion. 

ELIOT DANCE 



On the evening of the twenty-second Eliot Cottage, with its 
guests, spent a most enjoyable evening at the Barn. Many games 
were played, interspersed with dancing, both features greatly facili- 
tated by the prevalence of gymnasium costumes. 



8 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Convincing Reasons Why You Should 
Do Your Shopping in this Great Store 

In addition to being Boston's best store for new and novel articles, this house is 
undeniably the best store for staple floods of all kinds. Through our perfected system 
of merchandizing, you will find here, every week in the year, plentiful, assortments of every 
land af merchandise wecarry. 

OUR STOCKS ARE ALWAYS THE LARGEST. On account of the 
enormous uolumi of our business— it being larger than that of any three other New Eng- 
land stores— our assortments in each and every department are more than twice as large 
and complete as those shown i ls< where. 



OUR GUARANTEE.— Every article bought here— no matter 
how low the price may be, carries our guarantee of satisfaction to the 
purchaser. 



Jordan Marsh Company 



ALUMN/E NOTES. 

In addition to notes concerning graduates, the Alumnae 
column will contain items of interest about members of the 
Faculty, past and present, and former students. 



Mrs. Irwin Rew (Katharine Jones, 1899,) is spending the winter 
on the Riviera, with her husband and children. 

Miss Helen Segar, 1906, is working in the Visiting Nurse 

' VlissRuth White, 1907, is taking graduate work at the Univer- 

Miss SaraLawrence Kellogg, 1907, is cataloguer in the Columbia 

IV M5sMaA' W?Holmes, 1903, is director of the Bradley Kinder- 
garten, in one of the public schools of Asbury Park New Jersey. 
At the wedding of Margaret Fuller Jones, 1908, Maude Brad- 
field, 1907, Mrs. Charles Wesley Turner, 1908, Roma Love, 1908, 
and Marie Spahr, 1909, were present. 

ENGAGE MENTS. 
Miss Helen A. Newell, 1907- to Mr. Samuel Walter White, 
Harvard, 1908, of Louisville, Kentucky. 

MARRIAGES. 
Tohnson— Jones. February I, 1910, in Columbus Ohio, 
Miss" Margaret Fuller Jones, 1908, to Mr Charles Cooke Johnson 
« ,f Columbus. At home after March 1 5, at Grasmere, the National 
Road. Alton, Ohio. , 

White Anderson. February 14, 1910, at lulsa, Oklahoma, 
Miss Willye Anderson, 1909, to Mr. Frederic Hall White. At home 
after August 1, in Seattle, Washington. 

BIRTHS, 
fanuary 23 1910, at Wakefield, Massachusetts, a son, Clarence 
Gray, Jr., to Mr . Clarence Gray Howes (Emily Freeman, 1906) 
CHANGES OF ADDRESS. 
Mrs. Malcolm W. Walla- (May Pitkin, 1895), 171 Roten 
Street, Toronto, Canada. 

Mi El a Chapin, [909, 2024 Anacapas Street, Santa Barbara, 

California. , T 

Miss Emma L. McAlarney, 1892, 500 West 121st Street, New 

York < „ . t, j 

Mrs. J. If. Hearding (Lucy Hartwell, 1893), 2305 Last 3d 

Sin 1 t. Duluth, Minn . , 

Uice Coit D 1 92-94. 5'73 Washington Boulevard, 
St. Louis, Missouri. 

B Mann (Ruth Paul, 1898,) 957 F°* ""'• New 

York City. 

Mrs. Joseph H. Lefferts 1 May Servi . 1894 96), i.U Pennington 

Avi nui . Pai aii , New J 

Mrs. Patterson (Maud Dewar, 1904)- l 7 il Ridge Avenue, 

livanston, Illinois. 



Mrs. Herbert Muzzy (Olive Nevis, 1905), 1924 West 6th 
Street, Los Angeles, California. 

Mrs. William Young (Helen Schemerhorn, of the class of 1906), 
315 West 97th Street, New York City. 

Miss Aurelia Fitzpatriek, of the class of 1908, 708 East 47th 
Street, Kansas City, Missouri. 

Mrs. Jerome P. Jackson (Mary S. Goldthwaite, 1897), 2015 
Stevens Avenue, Minneapolis. 

Mrs. Lucius Felt Hallett (Genevieve Pfeiffer, 1908), Logan 
Avenue, Denver, Colorado. 



THE COLORADO WELLESLEY CLUB. 
The Colorado Wellesley Club held its annual luncheon at the 
beautiful home of Mrs. C. E. Bullen, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 
January 22. Twenty members enjoyed a most delightful and in- 
formal good time. Miss Gail Laughlin, 1896, proved a ready and 
interesting toastmistress. Miss Cora Cowperthwaite spoke oit 
"Wellesley in the Eighties," Miss Lister, 1900, on "The Wellesley 
of To-day"," and Mrs. Braun, 1896, on "The Wellesley of the Fu- 
ture." Clippings from the College News were read. The singing 
of college songs and the Wellesley cheer closed a happy afternoon. 
THE BOSTON WELLESLEY CLUB. 
Notwithstanding the storm, it was a goodly company of former 
students of Wellesley who sat down at luncheon at Hotel Somerset, 
Saturdav, February 12. It was the occasion of the annual social 
event of the Boston Wellesley College Club. An informal reception 
was held from 12.30 to 1, in'the Somerset parlors, where all had an 
opportunity to meet and greet each other. 

In the dining-room the Club was seated at numbers of small 
tables. At the head table were the President of the Club, Miss 
Mary W. Caoen, the guests of honor. Miss Hazard, Miss Vivian and 
Miss Tufts, also Miss Alice W. Stockwell and Miss Florence L. 
Ellery, officers of the Club. 

Music was furnished by a stringed quartette, under the manage- 
ment of Miss Gertrude F. Whiteomb of Worcester. 

At the close of the delicious luncheon an intellectual feast was 
enjoyed. The President of the Club greeted the company and in- 
troduced the speakers. 

Mr. 1). Chauncey Brewer, the originator and enthusiastic repre- 
sentative of the American Civic League of Immigration, spoke on 
"Our Opportunities and Our Obligations to the Immigrants. 

The nexl speaker was Miss Roxana II. Vivian oi the Mathemat- 
ics Department of the College. She gave a most delightful and 
interesting talk on "The Turkish Worn n and the Constitution. 
Then Miss Edith Tufts, Registrar of the College, made a reporl ol 
tne latesl changes a1 the college, telling aboul the new buildings, 
the new memorial window in Houghton Chapel and some recent 
changes in ( College Hall. _ 

Thelasl speaker and the special guesl oi honor was Miss Hazard, 
who mentioned some things of interest in tin new library and new 
gymnasium, also calling attention to the animal report of tin 
President, which is about to go out to the Alumnae and others. 
Tin delightful social affair closed with the Wellesley cheer. 

Florence L. Ellery, Recording Secretary. 



A 



1